An unexpected announcement.

Delays are unfortunate, but in some cases it allows us to pause and consider everything going on around us. We are all going full steam ahead in our day-to-day lives; we never really stop to relax, and when we do—whether in a staycation or at a place far from home—we worry about what needs to be done in the back of our minds.

I tend to push myself a lot when it comes to work; I don’t stop until a project is done, and even then work is not completely over. However, these past few weeks have shown that even though I’m writing (and working), I’m not superhuman. I may think it, but I most definitely am not. I guess that’s part of my perfectionistic tendencies.

That brings me to the reason for this post: My next novel will be delayed by one month, and should be out by May 21st, 2017. This is a decision that is the result of me not wanting to rush out content, as well as to better take care of my health.

Aside from the next “From the Muse’s Bookshelf” post, which will focus on Margaret Atwood’s “The Handmaid’s Tale,” I hope to meet you all once more next month.

From the Muse’s Bookshelf: “The Call of the Wild”/“White Fang” by Jack London

It’s been a long time since I finished this book off (I actually started reading Murakami’s “Norwegian Wood” soon after, so there went all plans to do a book post right away), so let’s get right down to it!

If I had to describe these two books in one sentence, I would say this: They complement each other. Simply put, “The Call of the Wild” follows a dog who moves from the comfort of his human master to the more unforgiving master that is the wilderness. “White Fang,” however, is the complete opposite—it follows a wolf-dog from the harshness of his surroundings to the warmth that comes with (the right) human companionship.

“The Call of the Wild” starts off on a calm note, with the protagonist Buck in his master’s home. But things pick up when he is kidnapped and sold off as a sled dog. From then on, the rules he’s grown to know for most of his life—that of man—are broken little by little as he adjusts to the rules of the wild. With each turn, Buck’s mind sharpens. Yet, near the end of the novel, his ties to domesticity, to man, is broken for good.

The titular character in “White Fang” goes from wild to domesticity, but not without the harsh rule of man. After his human is tricked, White Fang lands in the greedy lap of another human—one who decides to use him in dog fights. But when White Fang no longer becomes useful, another human steps in to save him. At first this confuses the wild wolf-dog, but it is the beginning of a path to an unconditional love that exists between man and animal.

As a small side-note, more than ten years have passed since I read “The Call of the Wild,” and as for “White Fang,” I hadn’t read it at all (and watching the movie does not count). Still, I enjoyed both tales cover to cover.

Until next time!

 

An Anniversary Celebration & A New Novel!

Four months really does fly by in a flash, doesn’t it?

First off, the sequel to my debut novel Resonance is finally out: Vociferation was released just a couple days ago, and I have to say that I’ve never been more nervous. After all, this is a follow-up to a story that I released on the heels of nervousness one year ago. Currently, Vociferation is available for $2.99 until January 6, 2017. Get your copy here.

To add to that, it’s been a little over a year since I started my writing venture. Every little step I’ve made so far, whether it be good or bad, has brought me some experience, and what matters the most is that I am learning as I go.

Switching gears, I would like to state the reason why my releases are on the 21st of the month, and why I don’t put in any dedications.

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From the Muse’s Bookshelf: “Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World” by Haruki Murakami

Hello, all!

It’s been a little while since I last posted, and look where we are now: It’s almost summer! I finished off another of Haruki Murakami’s novels this week, and this is only the second Murakami novel I’ve read completely (the first? 1Q84, and you can find my reviews right this way.

What struck me about this was that the characters lack names. They’re only referred to by something that is used to identify them, whether it’s an object, the character’s age, or—in the End of the World—their profession. I was about three chapters in when I realized they alternated. One set of chapters deals with a data shuffler who lives in the Hard-Boiled Wonderland of daily life. The second set of chapters deals with a newcomer to a place called the Town, the only place of its sort in a bleak End of the World, where shadows are stripped from people upon entry. As the novel goes on, however, the way both worlds are connected is slowly revealed.

Given that I finished 1Q84 mere months ago, I really didn’t know what to expect when I started this one. Nameless protagonists aren’t something I’ve really encountered before in the stories I’ve read. It puts you in the protagonists’ mind, with a first-hand experience of things happening in both worlds. At the same time, you’re witnessing everything falling together. By novel’s end, I’d realized it wasn’t just a novel about two different worlds connected by one common link.

It was about human consciousness and what it means to exist.

Some additional notes.

It’s been a (long) while. For the curious, I’ve been dealing with a few changes out in the real world, which I hope will be for the better, so all I can do is keep my fingers and toes crossed. On the writing side of things, I finished the first draft of my third novel, but I’m still fiddling around and thinking of a title that will actually stick.

I also want to bring to your attention something that can go unnoticed. That is, my works’ availability on the other Amazon websites. The “Published Works” page will also be updated to include this information. I have to offer my apologies for noticing this and posting it so late.

 

Amazon UK: Resonance, Cosmoflux
Amazon Germany: Resonance, Cosmoflux
Amazon France: Resonance, Cosmoflux
Amazon Spain: Resonance, Cosmoflux
Amazon Italy: Resonance, Cosmoflux
Amazon Netherlands: Resonance, Cosmoflux
Amazon Japan: Resonance, Cosmoflux
Amazon Brazil: Resonance, Cosmoflux
Amazon Canada: Resonance, Cosmoflux
Amazon Mexico: Resonance, Cosmoflux
Amazon Australia: Resonance, Cosmoflux
Amazon India: Resonance, Cosmoflux

 

“Cosmoflux” Roundup post!

Cosmoflux has been out for a good week now, and strangely enough, I haven’t felt any sense of unease. I’ve felt unbridled happiness. This was a story I had a lot of fun writing, after all. I let myself loose while writing it, and took a (long) while to fine-tune the parts that needed it.

Unfortunately, today also marks the last day for Cosmoflux‘s introductory sales price of $2.99. From tomorrow onwards, it will be $3.99. So if you want to get it for $2.99, go to this page and get your copy today. By midnight, the price will be changed.

To everyone who’s shown support in some way shape or form since December, thank you once again.

EDIT 4/29/16 12:07 AM

Cosmoflux is now available for the regular price of $3.99.